Tuesday, 18 March 2014

Book acquisitions

Sometimes I'm disappointed when I buy a new quilt book, the cover promises so much but when you actually open the book, it can be an anti-climax with just pretty pictures and text linking them all together.  Not that there is anything wrong with that sort of book because I do like the pretty pictures but what I really love is reading about the quilt and the maker, what moved them to make the quilt, why certain fabrics were selected and others were not, the challenges encountered in making the quilt, all the sorts of things my friends and I talk about when we meet up to quilt.



I haven't read either of these two books properly, (yet) but my first skim read of both books tells me that they have already ticked all the boxes for me.

 Quilting with a Modern Slant by Rachel May is a book which is going to take some time to get through.  I've only read to page 42 and I want to stop everything I'm doing and immerse myself in reading this book.

There are the usual instructions for projects and plenty of eye candy, but the best part for me is the thoughts and different perspectives of the various quilters (and there are many) who feature throughout the book.  Scattered through the book are little quotes and hints, I love this advice from Malka Dubrawsky "Be fearless, and have fun.  After all it's just fabric"

I've been following the blog Thomas Knauer Sews since I saw a photo of a quilt he made for Quiltcon last year, so when I read on his blog that he was writing a book, I put it on my Books to Buy list.  The book arrived last week and is another book that will require quality time spent in reading it, (I'm up to page 13)  there are patterns and photos, but more importantly to me there are the conversations about each quilt, the inspiration behind the quilt, the colours and the fabrics used.

So you will excuse me if I am a little quiet over the next few days as I will be doing a bit of reading.



7 comments:

  1. what I really love is reading about the quilt and the maker, what moved them to make the quilt, why certain fabrics were selected and others were not, the challenges encountered in making the quilt, all the sorts of things my friends and I talk about when we meet up to quilt.

    Me too. I have a book about scrap quilts, I think it's called "warmth and wisdom" which gives a little history about each quilt.
    I shall be interested to know how you get on wwith your latest books.

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  2. I actually am quite often disappointed with a quilt book when I get it to the point that I do not purchase many any more - a lot of times it ends up that the only quilt I like is what is on the cover of the book or which has happened several times now is that the instructions - cutting - are not correct and if you try to contact the author for a correction you never hear from them!! Some books might be going to production too quickly.

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  3. i couldn't agree more with your comments, and those of the other commenters, about quilting books. Great that you have found a couple with enough meat to hold your interest.

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  4. Have been wanting to read both of these books! It's great to find ones that actually tell the back story too.:)

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  5. Yes . . . personal stories are definitely the best. Recent books are often only about the product, and not the evolving process. Put your feet up!

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  6. I've been tempted by the Rachel May book, and have moved the Thomas Knauer in and out of my Amazon cart several times. I moved it out most recently when I read his essay in my quilt magazine, and wasn't really happy with it (maybe the English teacher in me wanted more?) but I'll be interested to hear your review of it, then go from there.

    Thanks for mentioning this. I should do this more, and I do tend to buy a quilt book a month, I've discovered!

    Elizabeth E.
    opquilt.com

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